Game 2 – Cleveland Vs. Boston

 

 

After reviewing the game video, Cavaliers coach Mike Brown said some of the team’s standard offensive principles of ball movement and of general rotation broke down in the 76-72 loss in Game 1.

Cleveland Cavaliers LeBron James has history of rebounding from bad games

“He is who he is and it’s as simple as that,” Brown said. “He’s human and he had a tough night. He hasn’t had many tough nights in a row. Usually when he has a tough night, he bounces back the next game and has a pretty good game.”

King James human after all

LeBron James emerged from the trainer’s room, headphones on his ears, to face the music. Well, not the music, exactly. But to face what has become a commonplace battery of television cameras, microphones and reporters’ notebooks that surrounded his locker and left barely enough room for the big man to stand

This was before his Cleveland Cavaliers took the court against the Celtics last night in Game 1 of the Eastern Conference semifinals.

Afterward, he had plenty more questions to answer following what was arguably, especially considering the circumstances, the ugliest game of his brilliant career.

With Game 2 tonight, here’s five reasons for each team to be concerned:

Don’t expect to see a repeat of game 1 in the Cavaliers Vs. Boston series

The Cavs

1) Kevin Garnett can get his shot whenever he wants. And unlike so many times in his career when he deferred at the expense of taking over a game, he might like the taste he got in Game 1.

2) Garnett doesn’t have to cover Ben Wallace. No opposing big man does. But Garnett isn’t just any opposing big man on defense.

3) Ray Allen’s shooting slump won’t last seven games even if the Cavs do.

4) Two of the Boston Three Party aren’t likely to bomb on the same night again.

5) Rajon Rondo and Sam Cassell. This is like trying to hit a knuckleball after facing a 95 mph fastball. Just shy of his 65th birthday, Cassell not only still looks for his shot but can make it.

 

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